Archive for July, 2010

*Ahem*

I’m gonna go back and change the ‘sneaky peek’ titles as I’ve had a trend flagged up on the blog stats that shows I’ve an influx of people searching for a male changing room hidden cam site going by that name … each to his own, and if they’re looking for a load of bollocks they’re not far off, but to save disappointment on their part (so to speak) I’ll rename ‘em.

Posted: July 30th, 2010
at 9:58pm by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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Tonight

At last I feel like it’s starting to come together. Most scenes are in progress to various degrees, but the first six minutes are now complete as a first draft and bar the odd glitch, actually run together pretty nicely! There’s things here and there need tweaking and finessing but I’m gonna try and plough on through next week and come back for another pass when the whole lot’s in there. I think the nice thing, and a good sign, is that watching it back I’ve begun to watch it as events unfolding rather than just a compilation of separate shots, which is actually quite exciting.

Good stuff!

Posted: July 30th, 2010
at 9:52pm by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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UKFC

Don’t want to prattle on toooooo much about this, but there are some interesting stats and facts about The UK Film Council that make recent events all the more baffling …

Since its creation in 2000, the UK Film Council invested over £160m of Lottery funding into more than 900 films to an audience of over 200 million people, generating over £700 million at the box office worldwide. £5 for every £1 of Lottery money invested.

It supported new filmmakers, funded ambitious new British films and got a wider choice of films to audiences throughout the UK. It also invested in training British talent, promoted Britain as an international filmmaking location and raised the profile of British films abroad.
Since 2000 the UK Film Council has funded such films as Bright Star,The Constant GardenerFish TankGosford ParkHappy-Go-Lucky, In the Loop, The Last King of Scotland, Man on Wire, Nowhere Boy, Red RoadSt Trinian’sThis is England, Touching the Void, Vera Drake ,The Wind That Shakes the Barley and Streetdance 3D, the UK’s first 3D film.
Upcoming films backed by the UK Film Council include Mike Leigh’s Another Year, Stephen Frears’s Tamara Drewe, Nigel Cole’s Made in Dagenham, Joe Cornish’s Attack the Block, Rowan Joffe’s Brighton Rock, Lynne Ramsay’s We Need to Talk about Kevin, Justin Chadwick’s The First Grader, Tom Hooper’s The King’s Speech, Peter Mullan’s Neds and Andrea Arnold’s Wuthering Heights.
Current UK Film Council funding initiatives included:
the world’s first Digital Screen Network, which has invested in 240 digital screens in cinemas across the UK, increasing film choice, bringing the 3D experience to a wider audience, and ensuring the UK has more digital cinemas than any other European country; awarding three newly-formed consortiums a total of £1.2 million of Lottery funding, to bring the latest in digital cinema to venues across four ‘under-screened’ UK counties (North Yorkshire, Shropshire, and Wiltshire and Test Valley (Hampshire)), giving rural audiences the opportunity to enjoy a modern digital cinema experience – including 3D film screenings, live opera, theatre and sport satellite events beamed across the UK – without having to travel long distances; supporting over 200 film societies and independent regional film venues; UK film festivals, including the Edinburgh International Film Festival, the BFI London Film Festival and the Sheffield International Documentary Film Festival; working with Skillset, the UK skills and training industry body for the creative industries, enabling almost 7,000 people to further their filmmaking careers; giving over 20,000 young people the opportunity to get involved in filmmaking through First Light and Mediabox; bringing FILMCLUB to thousands of schools, introducing new generations of children to the best of British and international cinema.

The UK film industry has a turnover of £6.8 billion. It contributes a total of over £4.5 billion a year to UK GDP, returns more than £1.2 billion to the Exchequer and supports a total of 100,000 direct and indirect jobs.
The UK box office has grown by 62% since the UK Film Council was created (in 2009 it reached record levels of £944 million), with British films accounting for 23% of all UK cinema takings over the ten years to 2009.
Recent figures show that in 2009:
cinema admissions rose to 174 million, the highest figure for seven years;
British films and talent won 36 major film awards, 17% of the total available;
inward investment reached a record £753 million, up 111% on 2008;
UK film exports exceeded £1.3 billion, 92% higher than in 2001.

It’s odd that over the past ten years I was always under the impression the UK industry survived against the odds and was struggling toward some kind of reluctant renaissance, when it turns out that may well have been the Golden Era and we didn’t realise it at the time … very silly.

Posted: July 30th, 2010
at 9:05am by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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Today

Updates:

Editing: Paul at Trim’s busy so that ideas on hold, in the meantime I’m ploughing on.

Music: My wife says ditch the music over, so I have. Some people you just don’t mess with.

Other stuff: Whilst I’m cutting, I’m also trying to design an aesthetic for the film as a package, might sounds a bit horse before cart, but needs to be done once the films wrapped so I can get on with promoting it straight away. Probably something a little along the lines of the old treatment, but I also need to consider what I’m actually going to do with it in regards to releasing/screening it too. Online is an option of course, but it’d be nice to get it doing the rounds on full size cinema screens first, at least as a way of contriving a wrap party for the crew who never got to have the -very much needed- piss up at the end of the shoot.

After the Film Council going tits up I’m not massively sure how to approach things, but there’s always youtube!

Woohoo.

Posted: July 29th, 2010
at 11:33am by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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He shoots he almost scores

(whats with all the horrendous puns!?)
I’d not intended to score this film really. I’d always seen it as being really sparse naturalistic sounds bookended by an instrumental over the titles and a folky song at the end, specifically ‘No Bad News’ by Bonnie Prince Billy. Bloody love that track, and it fits perfectly with the mood and lyrics and whatnot, problem is, on applying for a licence I’ve discovered he doesn’t actually licence any of his tracks out, so that’s out the window.

At the very germ of the idea for this whole thing was to approach it like a social realist horror, pretty nonsensical really, but like Ken Loach shooting a Del Toro film. Basically a realistic feel to a fantastical creepy tale, but not all hand held fake-umentary. The concept sounds good but really it’s just Tales Of The Unexpected, with less of a twist! Now I’ve shot it, it’s now not really a horror at all, and it doesn’t look or feel anything like a Loach film either so that’s all out the window too!

That said, I’m now considering putting a bit of a score to it to make it more cinematic, probably more sound design than anything melodic, … something very subtle anyway. By way of a stand in I’ve been playing Nick Caves soundtrack to The Proposition over it, and chriiiiiist in a bucket I now can’t imagine anything else working as well as it does, quite heavy handed though.

I guess I’ll stick to the Cave stuff for now and then commission some music in a similar vein at a later date. Or chase Nick Cave … ?

Oh and Max Richter’s new album Infra is absolutely the best thing he’s ever done, despite my only having had it for an afternoon, so I may well chase him too.

I’ve heard Jonny Greenwood’s good n’all.

Aim high I say.

Anyway, disregard this post as my wife’s just watched a clip and said the music doesn’t work at all and she preferred it before.

And d’you know what? I think she’s right.

So fickle!

Posted: July 28th, 2010
at 11:25pm by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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Today

A change of sound is currently a BIG help.

I’ve just ditched all the audio and plonked ambient tracks sourced from here ‘n there over the non dialogue scenes. Just bird song, radio commentary, etc, it’s not a big change, but it really glues all the cuts together.

Some of the issues I’ve had up to now were related to cutting with camera recorded sound present – (the intention being to replace this with on set recordings from Stu at a later date) – which made it surprisingly hard, for me anyway, to gage the pacing when each cut has its own audible click or volume change or whatever, and especially when my unintelligible monotone mumble chips in with ‘ok, kate’ or ‘nice’ or ‘lets have another one of those’ like some gigantic, booming, retarded, off-camera muppet. Similarly cutting it silent is tricksy as in a way the cuts seem to look clunky, probably because when theres nowt to listen to your senses re-adjust and your eyes over compensate. Or something.

Chopping this patchy sound out has really blended it all together far better, and I actually reckon its beginning to work, at least the first 6 minutes I’ve done to near finished standard anyhooo (I’ve done more but as mentionned yesterday, these are currently stand alone vignettes).

I’m still too FuCkinG slow though … CHOP! CHOP!

Posted: July 28th, 2010
at 1:48pm by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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… peek #5

Posted: July 28th, 2010
at 8:55am by Griff


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Today

I’m cutting chronologically at the moment. Should have done it in the first place, but previous to today I’ve been cutting things independent of one another as stand alone scenes – a move on from just selecting the best shots, and a way of limbering up for the proper push.
I remember reading something ages ago, that as a rule of thumb, that you should try losing the last sentence of dialogue in any one scene in a script, & I get this totally. Sounds weird but it makes utter sense when you do it, cos I guess it’s human nature to want to wrap up a scene when you’re writing it, but it often feels forced when you come to shoot, and it’s rare that that last sentence would hold enough clout to be indispensable, it generally just reiterates whats gone before or hits a false, full-stop, style note. Anyways, it’s equally applicable to non dialogue scenes. They all sit a little more comfortably together when they’re left looser, more open ended, and not neat bookended vignettes, so I’ve essentially been chucking away the bookends.
I also read some quote about the edit being a vase into which dead, cut flower buds are arranged, and then they blossom and flower up against each other and … I don’t fully remember it, and it certainly wasn’t as wankily worded as I just attempted, but you get the gist.
Is wankily even a word? It’s definitely being flagged as a spellcheck concern.

Posted: July 26th, 2010
at 11:00pm by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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UKfc-ed

Reports of the death of British Independent cinema are not so exaggerated …

apparently.

Posted: July 26th, 2010
at 1:43pm by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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Loose Stork costs lives

or something

Posted: July 23rd, 2010
at 9:28am by Griff


Categories: Stork Nest

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